In my practice, I utilize clay as a way of interpreting the processes that led to the contamination of neighborhoods in my hometown near St. Louis, Missouri. My high school was located next door to a nuclear waste disposal cell, previously home to a chemical processing plant. The waste from the plant was eventually disposed of in the underground storage cell that remains today.  I created this website not only as a platform to share my work, but as a way to share my experience and my research into the history of contamination in my hometown.  It took a few years of distance and reflection after graduating from high school to realize how surreal the experience actually was and a few more years of accumulating information to reach this point.  There is an emotional distance and a barrier of offbeat humor that surrounds the school and protects it from the reality of the situation.  The school was built on the same land that was used for processing uranium and other hazardous materials during and after World War II and is only one example of locations in the St. Louis area that have been impacted over the past several decades.  More information about this site and others, as well as the links between them, can be found by following the tabs in the navigation bar. 
Bunker door located in Weldon Spring Conservation Area
Bunker door located in Weldon Spring Conservation Area
Weldon Spring Site
Weldon Spring Site
Francis Howell High School as seen from the top of the Weldon Spring disposal cell
Francis Howell High School as seen from the top of the Weldon Spring disposal cell
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